Courtesy of Joy R. Absalon-USA TODAY Sports

Orioles' deal with Colvin off


Late yesterday afternoon we found out that the deal that the Baltimore Orioles were looking to sign with free agent outfielder Tyler Colvin had officially been voided. In a story that might well be the second coming of the Grant Balfour situation, the O’s couldn’t reach a deal with the player due to issues surrounding the results of a physical. You get the impression that there’s a fool me once, shame on me – fool me twice… type of feeling among fans in Birdland. Even in this column, we’ve wondered aloud whether or not the O’s were at the very least over-scrutinizing their physicals. So is that’s what’s happening here?

It’s possible, and I’ll grant that it’s probably more plausible than the conspiracy theory which

states that ownership nixed the deal for financial reasons. Colvin’s would-be contract we slated to be in the range of two years, $15. Furthermore, the 28-year old outfielder has had a flurry of injury problems in his recent past, including a collapsed lung. So I would caution people about just assuming that the Orioles were wrong in this case.

The team does have a minor league offer on the table for Colvin, however at this point he’s apparently still looking to get a major league deal someplace. That is certainly possible, however if not there’s always still the chance that he signs with the Orioles and accepts an invitation to spring training. Ultimately the Orioles not getting Colvin isn’t too much to be worried about, however some folks feel that there is the perception that the Orioles are trying to get out of paying people their contracts. Again, my personal view is that the Orioles’ physicians are some of the best in the business, and if they say the contract should be a no-go after the physical, the team would be foolish not to listen.

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Tags: Baltimore Orioles Tyler Colvin

  • Ryne Mehan

    Colvin would be such a nice piece for the Os to have. I felt they should have traded for him before last season started, along with trading for Morse when he was expendable on the Nats because Laroche resigned at the time. That definitely would have solved their DH problems.

    I hope they somehow are able to keep him because he is a very good player when healthy. He could serve as their primary DH against righties, along with Delmon Young and Nolan Reimold against lefties. Yeah, it doesn’t sound like a feared combination but it would be a very productive one.

    • Domenic Vadala

      I don’t think he would have been a terrible addition to the team either. And they might still net him if they’re lucky. Thanks for reading!

  • John Fenton

    What sound does an Oriole make? Cheep cheap cheap

    • Domenic Vadala

      Maybe next time they can let their all-star CFer test the market in the name of saving money. Big difference between not wanting to pay for quality and not wanting to pay for an injury risk.

      • John Fenton

        And the third choice is not to pay AT ALL which seems to be the strategy to date. They have publically stated the payroll “should be” around 100 million – it is currently under 80 million so what are they doing? Saving it for Davis? hahahahahahahaaaaa

        • Domenic Vadala

          First off, this isn’t exactly the greatest year for free agents. Secondly, they paid Davis – a fact that most people will conveniently forget. So with that said, what would you have done, or what would you like to see the Orioles do? Keep in mind that this is a team that was in playoff contention until the final week of the season in 2013, so we’re not exactly talking about wholesale changes that might be necessary. And that’s part of why I don’t understand the “outrage” of some fans. I think that people feel the O’s will end up with 69 wins in 2014. The same players don’t go from 85 wins back to winning only 60-70 games (without a massive amount of injuries). So again, what would you have liked or would you like to see the Orioles do?

          • John Fenton

            If you take ANY team with 85 wins ans subtract from that team in terms of starting pitching (the team’s weak area last year), the closer, an on base left fielder, a 2nd baseman and you don’t address the KNOWN problems from last year, you are NOT going to win 85 games again. What should they do? Get a top of the rotation pitcher, a proven closer, a good on base guy who can lead off, a proven DH or any combination of those – they have done NOTHING in those areas. I’m NOT suggesting they follow the Yankees spending but look at what the Yankees did when THEY finished with 85 wins and lost their 2nd baseman – they addressed those needs and and got a lot better – THEY will win more than 85 games and are a legit threat to win the WS, We Oriole are saying “can’t we do ANYTHING to get better?”

          • Domenic Vadala

            Well keep in mind that Roberts was injured for approximately half of the season last year (he played in 77 games), and the Orioles do in fact have an heir apparent in a sense in either Ryan Flaherty of Jonathan Schoop. So second base is not a question mark going into this season. The Jim Johnson move was one they had to make unless they wanted to pay a closer $10 million – which just isn’t prudent, regardless of what Oakland’s paying him. And the closer situation obviously was about to be remedied when they thought they had Balfour, but again I don’t think it’s prudent to take unnecessary risks. And the fact is that there are still some decent starting pitchers out there.

            Part of the Orioles’ issue is that they can’t seem to swing a trade. One might blame the fact that they don’t have too many trade chips in the organization, however the fact is that teams ask for far too much on the trade market with regard to the Orioles. In December the Mets were kind enough to offer them Ike Davis in exchange for Dylan Bundy. Last year they were offered Rick Porcello from Detroit in exchange for J.J. Hardy. And as recently as last off season teams still felt they could ask about Manny Machado. So if they had the chance to swing a trade or two they might find themselves in a better place.

            However the fact is that the core of what got them to 85 wins last year (Davis, Jones, Wieters, Machado, Hardy, Markakis, etc) is still in tact. You might throw Johnson’s name in there as part of that core and of course he’s gone, but so are his nine blown saves. So in that sense perhaps it’s a wash. Ultimately this is still a team that’s in contention in 2014 (barring injuries). That’s really all fans can ask.

          • John Fenton

            C’mon man….They won 85 games last year and the team is NOT better now than they were last year at this time….is Davis gonna hit 50+ HRs again? I HOPE so but to count on that kind of output is not realistic; are they gonna set another defensive record? I HOPE so but that is also not realistic. So they gave Davis money? Yeah, the money they saved from Johnson went to Davis – a wash. Look, if the OWNER is SERIOUS about competing, he will get some players with the 20 million he has said he would invest in the team (he said the team should have a payroll of 100 million and with Colvin falling thru, the payroll is under 80 million)…. Compete? Yeah we’ll compete – for third place. BTW, I’ve an O’s fan all my life and I’ve NEVER so disappointed with the off season as I am now. I’m tempted to jump on the Nats bandwagon – they have an owner who cares about building a quality team, the opposite of the loathsome Angelos….Just keepin’ it real

          • Domenic Vadala

            First off keep in mind that if you’ve been with a team forever and you jump ship you can’t suddenly play all the reasons you liked your old team forward to the new one. Translated: you can’t replicate watching them with your Dad as a kid, skipping school to go to games, etc. a fan who leaps due to their perception of the owner was never the fan they thought they were. I’m sure you’ll look great in red.

            That aside, they were going to have to pay Davis regardless of the Johnson situation; they’re mutually exclusive. But the point here is that unless you wanted them to go after Cano, there weren’t players of that caliber out there to be had this year. There are still some solid starters out there, and that market is just now starting to loosen up since Tanaka is off the table. So we very well might see some movement.

            It’s unfair to Davis to expect him to replicate 53 homers, but to assume he’s going to fall off the face of the earth is also foolish. I would agree with you if they had wholesale changes to the team, but it’s still intact.

          • John Fenton

            Of course I’m not gonna become a Nats fan after spending my WHOLE life as an O’s fan; it’s just a measure of my disgust with the current ownership that makes me understand we are not going to field a winning team year after year as long as Angelos is in charge. I admire your positive view and REALLY REALLY hope you are right….I will be happy if I’m wrong…

          • Domenic Vadala

            It’s worth noting that the Orioles have been a winning team the past two seasons, and with the vast majority of the current crop of players on the team now at that. So unless you want to argue that was a total fluke, there should be no reason to just assume that things will go to hell and a hand basket. The Orioles are still a young team and that means a lot in a division like the AL East.

          • John Fenton

            Well, define fluke – I am CERTAIN that if anyone knew that Davis was gonna turn into Crush, Texas would never gotten rid of him and the O’s success in one run and extra inning games two years ago was certainly “fluke-ish”. Let’s put it this way – if they return to the dismal form of the past 20 years, we will look on their playoff year as a fluke. I certainly hope they continue to grow and become better but under this owner I don’t see it. Thanks for your messages – They are interesting. John

          • Domenic Vadala

            Andy McPhail went back and forth with Texas for some time on the trade that sent Uehara to the Rangers. McPhail wanted Chris Davis because he knew the kind of power potential that he had. Texas didn’t want to give Davis up…because they knew the kind of power potential that he had. In the end McPhail won out because Texas desperately needed relief help at the time. So did they know that he’d hit 53 homers? Of course not, but they knew that he had the potential to be a good power hitter. In other words if we’re keeping score, advantage: McPhail.

            Again, common sense dictates that the same group of players is going to give you similar results. Davis and Jones aren’t suddenly going to be hitting 15 HR’s a year, Wieters isn’t suddenly going to cease to be able to throw runners out, and Machado’s glove isn’t going to turn into swiss cheese. Can they still improve the team? Sure, and I think that they probably will with a pitcher. But to argue that they’re leaps and bounds behind where they’ve been is simply incorrect. I’m glad you’re entertained by the “messages” I leave just for you, but responding is part of my job.

          • John Fenton

            Part of your job?? Are you paid by the team??? If so, I can understand your reluctance to be even a little “realistic”. Angelos is paying you……

          • Domenic Vadala

            Who I draw a paycheck from is of no concern to anyone aside from me and the payor. However I am the Senior Editor of this site (and in the past I’ve appeared as a guest writer on MASN) and part of my job is the interact with readership when they write in. That’s not always a walk in the park, believe me.

            The problem with some folks is that you only consider “realism” a view with which you agree. If this were 2007 and I was arguing that Aubrey Huff and Kevin Millar were going to take the Orioles to the promised land, it might be a different story. But I have statistics from the past couple of seasons with many of these same players backing me up. So what I’m telling you is that logic dictates the same group of people will produce similar results. They might not be exact year-over-year, however common sense says they’ll be similar and thus you won’t see massive steps backwards by the likes of Davis, Jones, et al. To believe otherwise goes against logical thought processes, and thus against the concept of “realism.”

          • John Fenton

            Well, yes – you are starting to repeat yourself… Most folks are reluctant to bite the hand that feeds them and if you ARE being paid by the team, you are going to paint them in the most positive way. Tell me, what is your realistic assessment of the owner Mr. Angelos?

          • Domenic Vadala

            I never said I drew a paycheck from the Orioles – I simply stated that it was no concern of readership from whom I drew a check. As for Peter Angelos, I don’t think he necessarily has the tools to be a good baseball front office guy. I also think he took longer to realize that than most fans of the team. That was obviously to the detriment of the team for quite some time. However I think that he started to realize this when he hired Andy McPhail, and since that time we haven’t heard too much of him mettling. Certainly he wants to know what’s going on with the team (his investment), and I would hope that nobody among us could blame him for that. However he’s largely let the baseball people make the baseball decisions and I’m not sure anyone can ask much more.

            The rebuttal to this will probably be “then why haven’t they made any big splashes if he’s not somewhere at the top pulling the strings?” In fairness, what big contract has been handed out in the past few years that would have made sense for the Orioles? I would submit that they’ve largely tried to improve the team by trades (and low-level signings), and that hasn’t worked because people have asked for too much in return. If anything, that in and of itself should tell folks that Angelos isn’t as hands-on as in the past because I think he probably would have made those trades simply for the sake of making trades. In sum, he has his faults. But I think he’s learned to a certain degree that he has to let the baseball people do their jobs. It’s also worth mentioning that at a time when it looked like the Orioles might be moving out of town, Peter Angelos swooped in and bought the team – giving the people of Baltimore a gaurantee that as long as he and his family owned the team they’d be the Baltimore Orioles.

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